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South Aiken literary magazine keeps winning awards

Posted: May 17, 2017 - 1:23am
Calliope staff members are (back row, from left) Emily Chafin, Olivia Esselman, Lydia Duncan, Catlyn Rugg and Lydia Terlizzi; (front row, from left) Nicolas Diaz, Elizabeth Keeter, Jazmyn Doerr and Susan He. Not pictured are staffers Caroline Pethick, Mary Riggins, Nicholyn Leonard and Samantha DeLoache.
Calliope staff members are (back row, from left) Emily Chafin, Olivia Esselman, Lydia Duncan, Catlyn Rugg and Lydia Terlizzi; (front row, from left) Nicolas Diaz, Elizabeth Keeter, Jazmyn Doerr and Susan He. Not pictured are staffers Caroline Pethick, Mary Riggins, Nicholyn Leonard and Samantha DeLoache.

South Aiken High School's award-winning magazine Calliope has earned a national reputation for excellence over the years, and this year has been no exception.

Under the guidance of faculty adviser Ginger Dunker, the Calliope staff garnered a number of awards for the 2016 edition of the magazine, including national recognition with Highest Award honors from the National Council of Teachers of English, and first place and Outstanding Use of Color awards from the American Scholastic Press Association.

The magazine also earned an excellent rating from the Southern Interscholastic Press Association, and a superior rating from the South Carolina Scholastic Press Association.

Several of the magazine's contributors received individual recognition from the SCSPA, including Zerrin Varnadore (third place, best nonfiction article); Sydney Simpson (second place, best review); and Camilla Myers (third place, best short story).

"The writing and the visual arts for this issue were much improved," Dunker stated. "Zerrin presented an honest and vivid picture of a hot, humid day during hurricane season, and her living in poverty as a small child. Her imagery conveys the powerful, honest and raw experiences of a small girl living on the east coast of Florida.

"Sydney's satirical revelation of the woes of high school life from the perspective of a senior revealed a sardonic look at education. Again, the raw honesty compels us to think about how we could improve our educational system through the eyes of a student. Camilla's short fiction was quite entertaining even from the opening line. By placing her characters in action immediately, she was able to hold the reader's attention to the end of the spelling-binding tale."

As a group, Dunker said, the magazine's writers weaved their unique voices into a seamless literary tapestry.

"All of the writers who won state awards came from my creative writing class and this particular class was a unique blend of writing talents," she said. "They excelled with every assignment and provided great support for one another."

Collectively, the Calliope staff displayed an outstanding work ethic over a long period of time and overcame a wide variety of challenges.

"All of the staff members worked diligently to make the magazine happen, whether they worked on fundraising, layout and design, collecting submissions or reading and selecting submissions, or editing," Dunker said. "Our greatest challenges were raising enough money to cover the costs of publishing and meeting copy deadlines since we were dealing with graphic design, writing, and theme simultaneously, but the entire staff was terrific."

 

National, Regional and State Recognition for South Aiken High's Calliope

National Council of Teachers of English

• The Highest Award (334 entries nationally with 24 Highest Award recipients).

American Scholastic Press Association

• First place

• Outstanding use of color

Southern Interscholastic Press Association

• Excellent rating

South Carolina Scholastic Press Association

• Superior rating

• Best nonfiction srticle - Zerrin Varnadore, 3rd Place

• Best review - Sydney Simpson, 2nd Place

• Best short story -Camilla Myers, 3rd Place

 

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