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Colonial Times: A Day to Remember to feature many activities

Posted: October 16, 2013 - 11:41am

Visitors to the Living History Park in North Augusta this weekend will watch the past come to life through re-enactments and exhibits at the 22nd Annual Colonial Times: A Day to Remember.

This free two-day event, sponsored by the Olde Towne Preservation Association, draws people from all over the Southeast each year, said association President Lynn Thompson.

The park opens at 10 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, and closes at 5 p.m. on Saturday, 4 p.m. on Sunday.

“We have our own militia, the Olde Town Militia (1760-1783) which will be drilling and teaching kids throughout the day,” said Thompson. “But we do not focus on the battle. We focus on day-to-day life during that time. We want kids to understand the hardships, the trials of that time. They have no idea what our ancestors went through. We have children ask us in some of our buildings, ‘Where is the light switch?’ or ‘Did people really eat that?’ when we talk about the cooking methods of that time.”

This year’s park activities will feature such activities as butter churning, candlemaking, hornsmithing, gold and silversmithing, meat smoking and curing, and quilting. Visitors can visit the woodworker, several blacksmiths, a toy maker, an Indian trader, a backwoods cabin display, the Thompson Academy with needleworkers, spinners and weavers, and a potter. They also can visit the milliner, the sutlers and the alchemist.
The Upper Row contains many new additions, including the holistic and herbal garden, the Sign of the Ram, the Windsor cabinet shop, and the Mercantile, where many items can be purchased. Also new at the park this year is The Glasshouse, which will be used to root herbs and plants of the Colonial era. Coming soon will be an 18th century gristmill.

On Sunday, an Anglican worship service will be held in the Meeting House.
Concessions will be available on both days. Funds raised from concessions and sales will go back into park funds for future events.

“As long as you tell the story, history will live,” said Thompson of the event. “You can sit all day and read a book but until you see it in action, it will not be as real.”

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