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North Augusta passes measures to speed Project Jackson

Posted: February 15, 2017 - 2:05am

North Augusta City Council gave final approval last week to two ordinances enabling the construction and operation of Project Jackson, and first-reading nods to agreements on an owner's representative and the stadium licensing agreement.

Mayor Lark Jones described the measures as coming "at the end of all the hoopla."

The main hoopla was the Master Development Agreement, which took years to reach final approval last month.

With Councilman Ken McDowell out of town, almost all of the votes Feb. 6 broke down to 5-1, with James Adams opposed.

Both third-reading items - an installment purchase transaction ordinance that enables the issuance of bonds, and creation of a Municipal Improvement District, where assessments are set to guarantee tax revenue to the city - passed on 5-1 votes.

The owner's representative agreement details how Greenstone and the city will work together while the project is being built.

Councilman Fletcher Dickert asked for it to be tabled so he could study it more, but his motion died due to lack of a second, and the agreement passed 4-2, with Dickert and Adams opposed.

The stadium licensing agreement, which details the relationship between the city and GreenJackets Baseball LLC, was amended during an executive session before the main meeting to move up the date by which the GreenJackets must deliver to the city $1 million in cash or the equivalent in material and fixtures. That will now happen by the end of March.

It passed 5-1, with Adams against.

Two items unrelated to Project Jackson passed 6-0. One involved receiving a half-acre of property from the state Department of Transportation on the west side of Georgia Avenue, near the Municipal Center. The state acquired 0.43 acre more land than it needed for a road project and offered to give North Augusta a quitclaim deed on it.

The other measure restricts uses of land in Maude Edenfield Park where tennis courts were recently refurbished.

The city received federal funding to rebuild the courts, and a requirement of the grant is that the land "may not be converted to other than outdoor recreational use," Jones said. It's a typical requirement and one the city has adopted in the past, he said.

 

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